Christian County, Kentucky

Christian county, Kentucky was formed in the year 1796, and named in honor of Colonel William Christian. It lies in the south-western part of the State, adjoining the Tennessee line: Bounded on the north by Hopkins and Muhlenburg; east by Todd; south by the State of Tennessee, and west by Trigg.

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 1,875 km˛ (724 mi˛). 1,868 km˛ (721 mi˛) of it is land and 7 km˛ (3 mi˛) of it is water. The total area is 0.37% water.

This county is twenty-two miles wide and thirty-two long, containing an area of seven hundred and four miles, and is the eleventh county in the State in point of wealth. The southern division of the county is generally composed of rich, fertile, level bottoms, and produces fine crops of tobacco, corn, wheat, rye, oats, and grass. The northern division is broken, and in some portions almost mountainous, with a soil less fertile, but sufficiently rich to sustain a large population-finely timbered, well watered, and abounding in inexhaustible beds of coal and iron ore. The general basis of the soil is a red clay, founded on cavernous limestone; and like most of the southern counties, abounds in sinks, caves and caverns. The situation of the county is elevated, and the surface of the country has a descending inclination in all directions from the centre, as it contains the head waters of Pond, Trade Water, Little, and the west fork of Red rivers : The first emptying into Green river, the second into the Ohio, and the two last into Cumberland river. Mineral and Sulphur springs abound, and many invalids visit them during the watering season. The staple products are corn, wheat, oats and tobacco-not less than 6,500 hogsheads of the latter article being exported annually ; while coal from the mines, in large quantities, finds its way to market.

There are eleven Towns in Christian county. Hopkinsville, the county seat, was laid out in 1799, on the lands of Bartholomew Wood, and called Elizabethtown-by which name it was known for several years. In 1804, it was incorporated by its present name, in honor of Gen. Samuel Hopkins. It is now an incorporated city, with a population in 1870 of 3,136, and on Jan. 1, 1873, of about 3,600. It has 4 warehouses engaged in the inspection and sale of tobacco, and 1 rehandling establishment; is the most important station on the Evansville, Henderson, and Nashville railroad; and the seat of one of the great charities of the state, the Western Lunatic Asylum. Petersburg, 18 miles w. of Hopkinsville, on the Henderson and Madisonville railroad, population about 100. Fairview, 12 miles E., population about 250, is partly in Christian and partly in Todd county ; in the latter part, the house now occupied by Andrew J. Kenner, is pointed out as that in which ex-President Jefferson Davis was born. Pembroke, 10 miles s. E., population in 1870, 278. Oakgrove, 13 miles s. E., on the Clarksville road. Longview, 8 miles s., on the turnpike to Clarksville, population about 100. Garretsburgh, 16 miles s., near the Tennessee line, population about 125. Bennetttown, 12 miles s. w., population about 125. St. Elmo, on Tennessee state line, 12 miles from Hopkinsville, population about 40. Belleview, 8 miles s. w., population about 140. Lafayette, 20 miles s. w., near the Tennessee line, population in 1870, 215. Crofton, 16 miles N. W., on E., H. and N. railroad, population about 150.

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